A message from Foothills MP John Barlow

Foothills MP John Barlow had almost 300 people turn up Sunday, September 24 in High River for a town hall meeting on proposed tax changes by the governing Liberals.

Barlow says the proposals will make the tax burden even higher for entrepreneurs, professionals, farmers and ranchers.

He adds the burdens on them to prove they’re not sheltering taxable income will be onerous.

“They’ve (The Liberals) labelled all of these small business owners and farmers and ranchers as tax cheats. And that’s very disingenuous. You’re trying to put a political spin on something just to try and sell your tax reform, which Canadians aren’t buying.”

Barlow says the Liberals are being told by citizens, the opposition, banking leaders and Chambers of Commerce from coast-to-coast, the tax changes are a bad idea and need to be scrapped or have the consultation process moved back from the Saturday, September 30, deadline.

The High River Chamber of Commerce has added their voice to the chorus against the proposed changes when they sent an e-mail to their members on Wednesday, September 27.

Your Chamber, believes that the proposed changes suggested by Minister Morneau to Tax planning will have a negative impact on all business.  We urge you to contact the government offices listed below, to urge the Government of Canada to reconsider the proposals, and extend the consultation period to allow for greater discussion and consideration of the impacts of these changes.

You as business people have the opportunity to provide input to the consultation on the federal government’s proposals..

Contact your officials today and express your concerns about these changes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau office 1-888-542-3725 by email assistance@liberal.ca

Minister Morneau office by email  fin.consultation.fin@canada.ca

MP Kent Hehr  Calgary office 403-244-1880  by email kent.hehr@gc.ca

More details are posted on the Chambers website hrchamber.ca

RBC survey showing Canadians love supporting small businesses.

High River Chamber of Commerce President Steven Muth Agrees with a new RBC survey showing Canadians love supporting small businesses.

A new poll by the RBC shows overwhelming support by Canadians for local small businesses.

High River Chamber of Commerce President Steven Muth, says he’s seeing it here too.

“The High River Chamber has been working with the Town of High River and some of the survey’s they’ve done that they’ll be releasing here in October, through the Vital Focus Survey that was done and High River residents and businesses completed, and we are seeing a similar feedback,” Muth says. “Many of the respondents agreed that supporting local business is very high on their priority list.”

Muth says High Rivertites have traditionally been strong supporters of local businesses.

Here’s the results of the RBC study:

According to the 2017 RBC® Small Business poll*, 88 per cent of Canadians will choose to support a local business when possible, and 57 per cent say they would pay more for a product or service that is offered by a local business.

In addition, today’s consumer is demanding more payment choice and opportunities to engage online and through social media.

“Canada’s small businesses are the driver of our local economies and when given the choice, Canadians want to support their small and local businesses,” says Jason Storsley, Vice-President, Small Business at RBC. “Owners and operators need to capitalize on this affinity for small businesses by satisfying consumer needs, like offering more payment options and engaging with customers online.”

Why payment choice matters

Canadians want more convenient payment choice with the majority preferring to pay by credit or debit, regardless of the purchase amount.

Cash is a popular payment method for items under $25, but declines sharply for items that cost more than $25.

Almost 70 per cent of Canadian adults say that they would spend more at a small/local business if it accepted more than just cash as a payment option.

Seventy-seven per cent of Canadians wish that more of the small businesses they frequent had ‘tap to pay’, and 47 per cent wish they had greater access to mobile payment options such as “Apple Pay” or “Android Pay.”

“In today’s digitally connected world, there are many tools and resources available to small business owners that can get them online and engaged with their customers,” says Storsley. “Taking advantage of these tools, from sales to payments to social, will allow businesses to profit and grow.”

Small business ownership is on the minds of Canadians

The majority of Canadians (63 per cent) have thought about owning their own business.

One in every three Canadians who has ever thought about owning a business has actually started or purchased a business at some point in their lives.

Greater control and money top the reasons why some Canadians want to own their own business, with 88 per cent saying that owning a business would allow them to have control over their future and 83 per cent saying that it would allow them to make more money.

This feeling is stronger among current business owners, 96 per cent of whom say that owning their own business has given them the chance to have control over their career and 90 per cent saying they have the opportunity to make more money.

And our affinity for small businesses doesn’t stop there – 63 per cent of Canadians said that they would prefer to work for a small business.

Millennials go beyond by helping to promote their favourite local businesses

When it comes to supporting small and local businesses, Millennials put their money where their ideals are.

Over two-thirds (69 per cent) say they would pay more for goods and services offered through a local business.

Furthermore, 75 per cent say they would support a local business by helping to promote them on social media.

In fact, 66 per cent of Millennials engage with small businesses through social media, more than 20 percentage points higher than any other age group.

Millennials are also demanding emerging payment options; 80 per cent wish more of the businesses they frequent had tap to pay, and 60 per cent wish more had mobile payment options.

Working for themselves is also top of mind for many Millennials with 74 per cent saying they thought of owning their own business, 11 percentage points higher than the average Canadian adult.

 

Election Forum

Do you have question that you would like to ask the candidates?

Email your question to the Chamber, prior to September 29,

email address hrdccxtra@gmail.com

Mayor’s Forum October 2, 2017

Candidates Forum October 3, 2017

Place Highwood Memorial Centre

Time 7:00PM – 9:00PM

Doors open to the public  at 6:30 PM

Federal Government proposed Tax Changes

Canada’s competitiveness
The last few years have been difficult for many businesses in Canada. Although our economy is expected to grow, most Calgarians and Calgary businesses are yet to see the benefits of a recovering economy.

Your Chamber, believes that the proposed changes suggested by Minister Morneau to Tax planning will have a negative impact on all business.  We urge you to contact the government offices listed below, to urge the Government of Canada to reconsider the proposals, and extend the consultation period to allow for greater discussion and consideration of the impacts of these changes.

You as business people have the opportunity to provide input to the consultation on the federal government’s proposals..

Contact your officials today and express your concerns about these changes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau office 1-888-542-3725 by email assistance@liberal.ca

Minister Moneau office by email  fin.consultation.fin@canada.ca

MP Kent Hehr  Calgary office 403-244-1880  by email kent.hehr@gc.ca

PROPOSED CHANGES

The tax changes being proposed will hurt hard-working Canadians, who are taking significant risks and forgoing other financial opportunities to create legitimate businesses and the jobs, incomes, and taxes they support. The  proposed changes demonstrate a clear lack of understanding on how businesses actually operate.

Families, especially spouses or partners, make large investments and sacrifices for a business to succeed. Often, a spouse may give up full time work in order to support the business – directly and indirectly. Limiting the amount of income that a family member can receive to their number of hours, or the capital-value contributed neglects the true costs of being a part of a family business. In many circumstances, income is “sprinkled” to family members as a payout for the use of family property as collateral, along with the subsequent income that is given up (i.e., opportunity cost), and the massive risked shared by the entire household. As the family bears the full risk of business failure, the family should also bear the full reward of business success.

Furthermore, comparing the income earned by business owners with the income earned by employees is simply unfair and does not represent an “apples-to-apples” comparison. Unlike an employee, a business owner doesn’t always receive additional pension contributions, Employment Insurance protections, health benefits, paid sick days, vacation pay, or consistent pay cheques. Business owners, and their families, do however, undertake extreme risk to start a business. Holding passive investments within a business has been a completely legal way for business owners to plan and save for their retirement, when other options – such as pension plans – are not available. Furthermore, the ability to retain passive investments within the business is often used as a tool to “save for a rainy day,” and is required to keep a business operational during slow periods. Simply put, deferring tax through this strategy allows business owners to keep staff employed during tough times.

Finally, we are concerned that the proposals around converting income into capital gains will affect business valuations from the past, and act as a form of retroactive taxation. Moving forward, the federal government must ensure that the proposed changes do not discourage the legitimate transfer of business ownership within a family.

CONSULTATION PROCESS

we are offended by the rhetoric that the federal government has put forward during the consultation period. The notion that small business owners are tax cheats or that these changes will only impact the wealthy is simply untrue.

These proposals will affect business owners who are firmly rooted in the middle class.

Given that these broad-reaching proposals may be the largest tax reform in decades, a 75-day consultation period in the dead of summer, is far too hasty. Greater discussion is needed to ensure tax reform does not have a large and negative impact on Canada’s business community. As such, the Government of Canada should extend the consultation period.

Let you MP know that this is not a done deal !!!!

 

 

High River Municipal Election Forums

The High River  & District Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors are pleased to host the following  2017 Municipal Election Forums.

Mayor’s Forum

October 2, 2017

Candidates Forum October 3, 2017

Place Highwood Memorial Centre

Time: 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Doors will be open to the public at 6:30 PM. The forum will start promptly at 7:00 PM. Late arrivals will be seated by our ushers

During the forum we will be accepting both written questions and verbal questions from the floor. However if you wish to submit a question by email. You can e-mail us prior to September 30, 2017 at hrdccxtra@gmail.com.

All are welcomed to attend.